Question How do you establish short term relationship with a client?

Virtcell

New Member
Hi everyone,

My question is how do you establish relationship with a client who, for instance, requires only few hours of service? Do you always sign a service agreement in theses cases? PC might be interested in my retainer packages, but firstly wants to try out the service.

Many thanks,
 

teel03

Member
Hi everyone,

My question is how do you establish relationship with a client who, for instance, requires only few hours of service? Do you always sign a service agreement in theses cases? PC might be interested in my retainer packages, but firstly wants to try out the service.

Many thanks,
Both my companies require a contract no matter what we are retained to do. In my contracts I have a cancelation clause which basically allows me or the client to cancel at anytime with or without cause. I don't want clients to feel they are locked in because that causes more problems.
 

ChiVA

New Member
Depending on who the client is (were they referred by someone you know/existing client) and/or where they are located (local? Out of state?) would determine what I would do. My hourly services agreements require a 2-hour minimum - however, I may offer the PC a free hour of administrative services or some sort of discount to entice them to want to sign a service agreement with me. As each client and situation is different, I always try to allow for some wiggle room.... with my time, with my contracts, etc.
 

Tess

Administrator
Staff member
In this case I'd probably provide a project-based contract and require payment up front.

Contracts help establish what the relationship is, what the expectations are, etc. so it's more than just a formality and isn't something I'd go without, ever.
 

Toni Mc

New Member
I agree with all the above comments. Requiring a "Work for Hire" agreement detailing the work involved, even if it's just for a few hours, shows you are a professional.
 
Always do some sort of an written contract and non-disclosure. Even if they want a trial run.

I'm working on getting a contract, NDA, and proposal pack ready to share. I just shared with another VA and she absolutely loved it. It's been vetted by lawyer.

The way my system works:

3 documents
1. contract
2. NDA
3. proposal

All of my clients start off signing all 3 documents. I have the contract and NDA in one document for them for ease, but it does require both to be signed.

The proposal is a separate document because that is part of the deal that changes and revolves frequently.

I have terminology in both the contract and the proposal that tells my clients the proposal once signed by them becomes a legal binding part of the contract we already have established.

My contract does not lock my client into remaining a client. I allow a notice for cancellation to occur by either party, but the contract does establish guidelines, terms and conditions of the working relationship. Who is responsible for what kind of thing. It also defines payment terms and other pertinent information required to run an effectual and safe client/VA relationship.

If you do not insist on a contract upfront then it will be harder to get one later. Establishing yourself as an expert in every way is extremely important to gaining their respect and trust. A contract from the very get go is one piece of the puzzle to doing this.

Having a contract will also protect you in the event of issues or debate. So you always want one in play no matter how short term the project is.
 

Virtcell

New Member
Great! Thank you all for your advises! Totally agree that it will give more professionalism to the business as well as mutual confidence between me and my clients.

Still learning... :)
 

Daisy Houdegbe

New Member
Always do some sort of an written contract and non-disclosure. Even if they want a trial run.

I'm working on getting a contract, NDA, and proposal pack ready to share. I just shared with another VA and she absolutely loved it. It's been vetted by lawyer.

The way my system works:

3 documents
1. contract
2. NDA
3. proposal

All of my clients start off signing all 3 documents. I have the contract and NDA in one document for them for ease, but it does require both to be signed.

The proposal is a separate document because that is part of the deal that changes and revolves frequently.

I have terminology in both the contract and the proposal that tells my clients the proposal once signed by them becomes a legal binding part of the contract we already have established.

My contract does not lock my client into remaining a client. I allow a notice for cancellation to occur by either party, but the contract does establish guidelines, terms and conditions of the working relationship. Who is responsible for what kind of thing. It also defines payment terms and other pertinent information required to run an effectual and safe client/VA relationship.

If you do not insist on a contract upfront then it will be harder to get one later. Establishing yourself as an expert in every way is extremely important to gaining their respect and trust. A contract from the very get go is one piece of the puzzle to doing this.

Having a contract will also protect you in the event of issues or debate. So you always want one in play no matter how short term the project is.
I love your website, great information!
 
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